Emily Eidam

Emily Eidam

Graduate Student

MG&G

I study coastal sediment transport processes near small and large rivers. Much of my work focuses on silt and clay dispersal from the surface plume to the boundary layer near the Elwha River, which has been the site of the nation's second-largest restoration effort. Between 2011 and 2014, two century-old hydroelectric dams were removed, allowing the river to transport millions of tons of sediment to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, a tidal strait which links Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia to the Pacific Ocean. Energetic tidal dispersal processes have limited the amount of new sediment accumulation in coastal environments near the river mouth, despite high sediment concentrations in the surface plume and boundary layer, as well as the occurrence of at least one major sediment gravity flow.

The Mekong River Delta is one of the world's largest deltas, in contrast to the small Elwha River system. At the Mekong I have worked together with scientists studying the internal architecture and radiochemistry of the subaqueous delta to understand sediment transport processes during the rainy monsoon and windy monsoon seasons. Seasonal changes in current patterns facilitate nearshore retention of sediment, and contribute to the overall delta geometry.

Through the Elwha and Mekong projects, as well as volunteer experiences locally and in Antarctica, I have been developing observational and data processing skills in the areas of time-series acoustical and optical instrument analyses and seabed coring. I'm excited to continue using these tools to understand sediment transport processes and deposit evolution in the coastal ocean, and thus improve our ability to model our changing coasts.

Emily Eidam

Emily Eidam

Graduate Student

MG&G

I study coastal sediment transport processes near small and large rivers. Much of my work focuses on silt and clay dispersal from the surface plume to the boundary layer near the Elwha River, which has been the site of the nation's second-largest restoration effort. Between 2011 and 2014, two century-old hydroelectric dams were removed, allowing the river to transport millions of tons of sediment to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, a tidal strait which links Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia to the Pacific Ocean. Energetic tidal dispersal processes have limited the amount of new sediment accumulation in coastal environments near the river mouth, despite high sediment concentrations in the surface plume and boundary layer, as well as the occurrence of at least one major sediment gravity flow.

The Mekong River Delta is one of the world's largest deltas, in contrast to the small Elwha River system. At the Mekong I have worked together with scientists studying the internal architecture and radiochemistry of the subaqueous delta to understand sediment transport processes during the rainy monsoon and windy monsoon seasons. Seasonal changes in current patterns facilitate nearshore retention of sediment, and contribute to the overall delta geometry.

Through the Elwha and Mekong projects, as well as volunteer experiences locally and in Antarctica, I have been developing observational and data processing skills in the areas of time-series acoustical and optical instrument analyses and seabed coring. I'm excited to continue using these tools to understand sediment transport processes and deposit evolution in the coastal ocean, and thus improve our ability to model our changing coasts.