Isaiah Bolden

Isaiah Bolden

Graduate Student

Chemical Oceanography

I am a Ph.D. student in the School of Oceanography working with Alex Gagnon. Specifically, our lab group mixes geochemical and modeling approaches to better characterize the biomineralization dynamics of marine calcifiers, like corals and foraminifera. Simply put, we look at: 

1). The mechanisms by which marine calcifiers currently build their skeletons.

2). How these processes will respond to the stresses of a changing climate (such as warming SST and ocean acidification).

3). How we can use this information to better understand the use of marine calcifiers as climate archives.

I received a B.A. with Honors in Earth & Oceanographic Science from Bowdoin College in 2015. My undergraduate thesis focused on the Ba/Ca ratio in coral skeletons as a proxy for precipitation, sediment discharge, and primary productivity reconstructions in coastal regions.

Since joining the Gagnon Lab at UW, I've been continuing to investigate the geochemistry of coral reefs ecosystems with an emphasis on the effects of ocean acidification, changing sea-surface temperature, and other stressors on calcification mechanisms and the overall fidelity of these marine proxies. I'm currently working on a series of experiments that aim to model, quantify, and characterize net ecosystem calcification (NEC) on coral atolls as a function of ocean acidification. This typically involves me venturing out to an isolated island in the Tropical Pacific for a 7-10 day field campaign every three months, analyzing a lot of water samples for alkalinity/DIC/trace metal chemistry, building "simple" differential models of the ecosystem's biogeochemical processes, and eventually rage-quitting MATLAB.  

When I'm not in the lab or field, I still enjoy talking to people about climate and marine science (outreach is a lot of fun). I am also an avid hiker, airplane/motoring enthusiast, and can often be spotted with fellow graduate students at any one of Seattle's numerous "trivia nights."

Isaiah Bolden

Isaiah Bolden

Graduate Student

Chemical Oceanography

I am a Ph.D. student in the School of Oceanography working with Alex Gagnon. Specifically, our lab group mixes geochemical and modeling approaches to better characterize the biomineralization dynamics of marine calcifiers, like corals and foraminifera. Simply put, we look at: 

1). The mechanisms by which marine calcifiers currently build their skeletons.

2). How these processes will respond to the stresses of a changing climate (such as warming SST and ocean acidification).

3). How we can use this information to better understand the use of marine calcifiers as climate archives.

I received a B.A. with Honors in Earth & Oceanographic Science from Bowdoin College in 2015. My undergraduate thesis focused on the Ba/Ca ratio in coral skeletons as a proxy for precipitation, sediment discharge, and primary productivity reconstructions in coastal regions.

Since joining the Gagnon Lab at UW, I've been continuing to investigate the geochemistry of coral reefs ecosystems with an emphasis on the effects of ocean acidification, changing sea-surface temperature, and other stressors on calcification mechanisms and the overall fidelity of these marine proxies. I'm currently working on a series of experiments that aim to model, quantify, and characterize net ecosystem calcification (NEC) on coral atolls as a function of ocean acidification. This typically involves me venturing out to an isolated island in the Tropical Pacific for a 7-10 day field campaign every three months, analyzing a lot of water samples for alkalinity/DIC/trace metal chemistry, building "simple" differential models of the ecosystem's biogeochemical processes, and eventually rage-quitting MATLAB.  

When I'm not in the lab or field, I still enjoy talking to people about climate and marine science (outreach is a lot of fun). I am also an avid hiker, airplane/motoring enthusiast, and can often be spotted with fellow graduate students at any one of Seattle's numerous "trivia nights."