John Bullister

John Bullister

Affiliate Associate Professor

Chemical Oceanography

John L. Bullister, Ph.D. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Univ. of California, San Diego), Affiliate Associate Professor



Research Interests (see link to CV below photo at left):

1.) The study of the entry of Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other anthropogenic compounds such as Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) into the ocean.
2.) The use of these chemical tracers to study the rates and pathways of ocean circulation and mixing processes, and for estimating the production rates (and variability) of intermediate and deep waters in the Arctic and Antarctic.
3.) The use of chemical tracers to improve estimates of the rate of anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake in the ocean.
4.) The use of CFC observations to test and evaluate numerical model simulations of key oceanic processes, including the uptake and redistribution of trace gases in the ocean, and the transfer rates and pathways of surface derived climate signals (e.g. warming) into the interior of the ocean.
5.) The importance of the ocean as a source/sink for reactive trace gases (including nitrous oxide and methane)..
6.) The degradation of CFCs in anoxic waters.
7.) Improving techniques for the high precision analysis of trace gases in the atmosphere and ocean.
 

John Bullister

John Bullister

Affiliate Associate Professor

Chemical Oceanography

John L. Bullister, Ph.D. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Univ. of California, San Diego), Affiliate Associate Professor



Research Interests (see link to CV below photo at left):

1.) The study of the entry of Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other anthropogenic compounds such as Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) into the ocean.
2.) The use of these chemical tracers to study the rates and pathways of ocean circulation and mixing processes, and for estimating the production rates (and variability) of intermediate and deep waters in the Arctic and Antarctic.
3.) The use of chemical tracers to improve estimates of the rate of anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake in the ocean.
4.) The use of CFC observations to test and evaluate numerical model simulations of key oceanic processes, including the uptake and redistribution of trace gases in the ocean, and the transfer rates and pathways of surface derived climate signals (e.g. warming) into the interior of the ocean.
5.) The importance of the ocean as a source/sink for reactive trace gases (including nitrous oxide and methane)..
6.) The degradation of CFCs in anoxic waters.
7.) Improving techniques for the high precision analysis of trace gases in the atmosphere and ocean.